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Hey Guys,

I'm doing a bid for a large apartment building, they are taking bids for 300-400 rooms. I would appreciate any help on how you'd break this down.

Thanks so much,

Fred
while i don't do apartments currently, all i can tell you is you need to know how much you need to make per hour to make a GOOD living. then figure how many apartments you can do per hour. then charge accordingly. only you can figure those numbers out. i hope you win the bid and make lots of $!   Big Grin
(04-17-2016, 06:58 PM)Derek Wrote: [ -> ]while i don't do apartments currently, all i can tell you is you need to know how much you need to make per hour to make a GOOD living. then figure how many apartments you can do per hour. then charge accordingly. only you can figure those numbers out. i hope you win the bid and make lots of $!   Big Grin

That's exactly what I worked on today...but I'm gonna offer a deep discount because I really want the account. Thinking of $35 per room, $5 if additional stain?
Really appreciate your response! I was hoping for a couple more, I'm sure guys are just too busy.

Thanks again 

Fred

*do you like your Whittaker?
it's OK. i griped about it in another thread where i gave a review after 1 year of using it.  http://nostickyresidue.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=2987&highlight=trio

saabtrash aka Todd on the forum here, likes his though! different strokes Tricky
I think no one can decide what I should charge because I am the only one that knows how much the job will cost me and I have to decide how much money
I want to make or be willing to walk away from.

So when each person puts a price on a job someone else will always say it is to high or to low.
Do some searches on this forum and other forums on business management and some have threads on pricing

http://nostickyresidue.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=556



http://methodcleanbiz.com/calculator/


I  would look at units and try to estimate how long each type of layout would take and start there. You have to chose how low you are willing to go to get the complex because there is always someone else willing to do it cheaper.  If you dont get estimate try to ask nicely and find out what price point they went for because you may be able to put in bid again someday in the near future. Property managers chew up and spit out us carpet cleaners fast....sometimes. You have to be able to provide dye repair and other carpet repair to keep large places a long time.



a great article by Dick Ragan who was a respected poster on ICS in the 90's and beyond. i scanned this image of his article in 1 of the trade mag's years ago, keep it taped to the wall in my office. it's really helped me to get over my fear of raising prices.
(04-18-2016, 10:17 PM)joel hoppe Wrote: [ -> ]I think no one can decide what I should charge because I am the only one that knows how much the job will cost me and I have to decide how much money
I want to make or be willing to walk away from.

So when each person puts a price on a job someone else will always say it is to high or to low.
Do some searches on this forum and other forums on business management and some have threads on pricing

http://nostickyresidue.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=556



[/url]http://methodcleanbiz.com/calculator/


I  would look at units and try to estimate how long each type of layout would take and start there. You have to chose how low you are willing to go to get the complex because there is always someone else willing to do it cheaper.  If you dont get estimate try to ask nicely and find out what price point they went for because you may be able to put in bid again someday in the near future. Property managers chew up and spit out us carpet cleaners fast....sometimes. You have to be able to provide dye repair and other carpet repair to keep large places a long time.



[url=http://methodcleanbiz.com/calculator/]

Thanks Joel,

Those were really helpful!
(04-18-2016, 11:08 PM)Derek Wrote: [ -> ]a great article by Dick Ragan who was a respected poster on ICS in the 90's and beyond. i scanned this image of his article in 1 of the trade mag's years ago, keep it taped to the wall in my office. it's really helped me to get over my fear of raising prices.
I love that article! Lots of good stuff there.

Thanks Derek
[attachment=691]Apts are 99% of what I do......And every area has totally different pricing.   I am in a unique location and cover 3 states, Parts of Southern Illinois, Southwestern Indiana and Western Ky. and each area has different pricing for everything. 

Some of the things you ( or at least I ) look at is total volume that you can expect per week or per month.   Student housing at colleges may give you 100 apts in a week, but you wont be back there until the end of the semester.....but all the apts are side by side, and you can knock out a lot in a day.      Other apts that has 300-400 units can expect a 25- 50% turnover per year, which translates into the neighborhood of 12 apts per month.....But then a portion of those would be replacements.....So figure on 8 per month or 96 cleanings per year.

Now going off of your comments of $35 per room......It is doable, depending on your location.....But if bids are being placed, rest assured that more than likely they will receive bids for much lower, especially if there is someone in your area who specializes in apt turns.   These companies will go low on the actual cleaning price.....Larger cities, I have seen 1 bedroom apts, including the living room, dining room and bedroom go for $40 total...But thats cleaning only.   They make their money on stain removal, carpet repairs, spot dyeing, restretching, whole room dyeing and sheer volume of work........Even though they price a 1 bedroom at 40 bucks, their average ticket price is in the neighborhood of $90 per apt with everything included.......dont seem like a ton of money......but add that 90 bucks to 15 apts in a day, and it adds up, especially if you have multiple properties.

Naturally, my advice to you is to see what your market can bare.  If its 35 bucks per room, then jump all over it......But on bidded work, at least around here, that will scare a PM away in a heart beat.   In some of my areas, I'm lucky to get $25 per room......And have others where its less than that......but I make up for it in add on's.

Also, if you get in, separate yourself somehow......Find out what the PM wants and exploit it.....The enclosed pic is how every apt we do looks like when we walk out.

Keep us posted
(04-19-2016, 09:27 PM)timhall Wrote: [ -> ]Apts are 99% of what I do......And every area has totally different pricing.   I am in a unique location and cover 3 states, Parts of Southern Illinois, Southwestern Indiana and Western Ky. and each area has different pricing for everything. 

Some of the things you ( or at least I ) look at is total volume that you can expect per week or per month.   Student housing at colleges may give you 100 apts in a week, but you wont be back there until the end of the semester.....but all the apts are side by side, and you can knock out a lot in a day.      Other apts that has 300-400 units can expect a 25- 50% turnover per year, which translates into the neighborhood of 12 apts per month.....But then a portion of those would be replacements.....So figure on 8 per month or 96 cleanings per year.

Now going off of your comments of $35 per room......It is doable, depending on your location.....But if bids are being placed, rest assured that more than likely they will receive bids for much lower, especially if there is someone in your area who specializes in apt turns.   These companies will go low on the actual cleaning price.....Larger cities, I have seen 1 bedroom apts, including the living room, dining room and bedroom go for $40 total...But thats cleaning only.   They make their money on stain removal, carpet repairs, spot dyeing, restretching, whole room dyeing and sheer volume of work........Even though they price a 1 bedroom at 40 bucks, their average ticket price is in the neighborhood of $90 per apt with everything included.......dont seem like a ton of money......but add that 90 bucks to 15 apts in a day, and it adds up, especially if you have multiple properties.

Naturally, my advice to you is to see what your market can bare.  If its 35 bucks per room, then jump all over it......But on bidded work, at least around here, that will scare a PM away in a heart beat.   In some of my areas, I'm lucky to get $25 per room......And have others where its less than that......but I make up for it in add on's.

Also, if you get in, separate yourself somehow......Find out what the PM wants and exploit it.....The enclosed pic is how every apt we do looks like when we walk out.

Keep us posted
Wow! Great information Tim. 

I met with PM yesterday for about an hour, we hit it off! He's a big basketball fan, and I was a college coach for about 20 years. I brought him proposal today, he grabbed it, looked it over, smiled and said I'd be hearing from him by the end of the week.

My proposal also had another pricing option that was higher for just single call outs (not during the turn)
(04-19-2016, 11:39 PM)Fred Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-19-2016, 09:27 PM)timhall Wrote: [ -> ]Apts are 99% of what I do......And every area has totally different pricing.   I am in a unique location and cover 3 states, Parts of Southern Illinois, Southwestern Indiana and Western Ky. and each area has different pricing for everything. 

Some of the things you ( or at least I ) look at is total volume that you can expect per week or per month.   Student housing at colleges may give you 100 apts in a week, but you wont be back there until the end of the semester.....but all the apts are side by side, and you can knock out a lot in a day.      Other apts that has 300-400 units can expect a 25- 50% turnover per year, which translates into the neighborhood of 12 apts per month.....But then a portion of those would be replacements.....So figure on 8 per month or 96 cleanings per year.

Now going off of your comments of $35 per room......It is doable, depending on your location.....But if bids are being placed, rest assured that more than likely they will receive bids for much lower, especially if there is someone in your area who specializes in apt turns.   These companies will go low on the actual cleaning price.....Larger cities, I have seen 1 bedroom apts, including the living room, dining room and bedroom go for $40 total...But thats cleaning only.   They make their money on stain removal, carpet repairs, spot dyeing, restretching, whole room dyeing and sheer volume of work........Even though they price a 1 bedroom at 40 bucks, their average ticket price is in the neighborhood of $90 per apt with everything included.......dont seem like a ton of money......but add that 90 bucks to 15 apts in a day, and it adds up, especially if you have multiple properties.

Naturally, my advice to you is to see what your market can bare.  If its 35 bucks per room, then jump all over it......But on bidded work, at least around here, that will scare a PM away in a heart beat.   In some of my areas, I'm lucky to get $25 per room......And have others where its less than that......but I make up for it in add on's.

Also, if you get in, separate yourself somehow......Find out what the PM wants and exploit it.....The enclosed pic is how every apt we do looks like when we walk out.

Keep us posted
Wow! Great information Tim. 

I met with PM yesterday for about an hour, we hit it off! He's a big basketball fan, and I was a college coach for about 20 years. I brought him proposal today, he grabbed it, looked it over, smiled and said I'd be hearing from him by the end of the week.

My proposal also had another pricing option that was higher for just single call outs (not during the turn)

Its always good to get on the good side of a property manager.....But its even better if you can get in good with their boss...The regional manager......He or She is the one that typically says yea or Nay on bids......

We have finally got over the hump, and now service over 50 properties.   I have several single management companies, but also have alot of management companies that has 2, 3,4 and even 5 properties within my area.......Large companies like that where we tend to make a sizeable revenue each week requires us to kinda cater to their needs........The volume of work though is well worth it.