Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Protector Questions
#1
I am still trying to get my head around the idea of how much good protectors do for the customer, when they need it, etc. etc.

I only seem to do protector a couple times a month. Probably mostly because I haven't convinced myself that most people should be getting it...

First question is, how much "good" does Rhino shield and/or fiber cop do for polyester, olefin type carpets? Since they are solution dyed I gather there isn't much stain resistance added?

Second question, is fiber cop better for some carpets/situations, or is rhino shield superior in all cases?
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#2
First question is, how much "good" does Rhino shield and/or fiber cop do for polyester, olefin type carpets? Since they are solution dyed I gather there isn't much stain resistance added?

Rhino Shield was designed solely for Nylon and Wool... it will not add acid-dye resistance to the other fabrics. It might help just a tad with soil resistance, but probably not worth what you would have to charge to apply.

Second question, is fiber cop better for some carpets/situations, or is rhino shield superior in all cases?

Fiber Cop is a tad bit better for soil and spill resistance, but overall Rhino Shield is superior because of its EXCELLENT Acid Dye resistance.
[Image: LogoSmall.jpg]
Products that make you a HERO in your customer's eyes!Rdance
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#3
Ok, I thought Kleenshield was just for nylon and wool, and Rhino was for everything. I typically only recommend protector to custys with nylons anyhow so that should work for me.

I thought I remembered reading somewhere that Rhino was for everything so I looked at the website. The website for Rhino shield says "It’s advanced fluorochemical base also makes it an excellent protector for solution-dyed carpets like polyester and olefin." It sounds like that isn't accurate?

Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#4
Grant - do your own tests!!

take a well traveled hallway & drop a garbage bag etc to make a straight line across the carpet & spray different competing products leaving a 6" or 12" gap between each one. draw a map and dont clean it again for 1 - 2 years, dig out the map & see your results.

I am not particularly fond of the 3M kit tests as the results are quite skewed as our carpets are not made of paper!

My tests have never shown a difference on olefin fibres & every 2 -3 years I phone 3M technical to see if they can send me any proof that it adheres to olefin. I have yet to receive anything suggesting it sticks. Furthermore, I dont have any cleaning issues cleaning olefins that have never been treated in 10 & 15 years. They still clean nicely - until shading (surface abrasions) sets in too far.

My tests have said it works on nylon & polyester however.

But you dont know - until you KNOW... so do your own tests!! Most manufacturers will send you a free gallon of their juice for testing & I am sure Jondon will send you a sample & a 3M marketing kit that still has some very useful materials - even when you use Steves juices.

Con
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#5
Whoops....Sorry Grant, I was thinking of Kleenshield when I wrote the above.... it's hell getting older.Wink However RhinoShield will still not give any Acid Dye resistance to solution dyed carpet so it is a poor choice of what is available due to the price. For solution dyed, FiberCop would be a better choice.

Personally, I wouldn't try to sell protector to owners of solution dyed carpet unless they insisted, but that is just me. There are are plenty that believe in doing so and for anyone that does, FiberCop is the one I would recommend.

If you want acid dye resistence only, KleenShield will give great acid dye resistance and clean the carpet at the same time.

You don't need any type of testing kit to test it either. All you need is a scrap nylon that has lost its resistance or a scrap piece of wool.

Spray 1/2 of the scrap and allow it to dwell for 10 to 15 minutes and then clean with any method including Hot Water Extraction. Allow to dry then place a few drops of Red Kool-Aid on both sides of the carpet and allow to dry.

Next use Spot-N-Boost or some other spotter and try to remove the Kool-Aid. The side cleaned with KleenShield will release the Kool-Aid pronto. It works with Nylon and Wool, but will not impart any soil resistance... only excellent acid-dye resistance. You can't buy any type of product that is similar anywhere else and should be sold to your customers as a premium service because it cost more to you. Using KleenShield will not cost you money, it will make you money if you sell it for what is does.

Steve
P.S. One way to make a scrap piece of nylon that has lost its acid-dye resistance is to spray it good with Lysol and allow it to dry. Then clean/rinse it well and allow to dry again. It will no longer have any acid dye resistance and will easily stain with products that contain Red Dye #40, such as Kool-Aid or Hawaiian punch.
[Image: LogoSmall.jpg]
Products that make you a HERO in your customer's eyes!Rdance
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#6
I used to have different thinking about a cleaner that protects at the same time.
I used to call BS on it.

But I'm much older...er um uh....Wiser now. Tongue


Seems to me that the BEST way to protect a carpet would be to clean with it in the mix.

What better way to make sure it's covering every fiber?
Just spraying and grooming is good but really swirling it around and then grooming...would be better...I would guess. I'm NO Steve Smith or anything.Good Job

Now if you can make a Peroxcellent mix that has a protector in it.....I believe I would be in Carpet Cleaning Heaven.

Get to work bud. TongueCoolBig Grin
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#7
Brian, right off hand I would say that a version of Peroxcellent that would impart acid dye resistance MIGHT JUST be possible. Of course, it would be EXPENSIVE.

I might do some testing when I can find the time... It would all depend on whether the acid-dye resisting additive is peroxide compatible or not.

The pH of both peroxide and a good acid-dye additive are compatible for sure.... they both require a lower pH, so it just might be possible.happy I will look into it at some point as I like to create new things... thanks for the idea!thanks

After thinking about it a bit, an even better way than having a version of Peroxcellent with built-in acid-dye resistance might be to have a separate additive that you could add when a customer was willing to pay extra for that service. I would have to make sure that the additive would not degrade when being added to the Peroxcellent.

Brian, you have my wheels turning!dance If I come up with something I will have you do some of the field testing.
[Image: LogoSmall.jpg]
Products that make you a HERO in your customer's eyes!Rdance
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#8
very interesting idea Steve! add dye resist... would be very cool... of course it would need to work significantly better than the former Teflon Advanced I would hope as i was very disappointed in the results there.

Con
Reply }}
Thanks given by:
#9
Con
I thought the Advanced was only Oil & Water spill protector, not an acid dye blocker? It beaded water based spills real well but didn't do much for acid dyes.

We use Fourguard that has Teflon and the acid dye blockers. It blocks the acid dyes but doesn't bead water based spills well. Confused
You never rolled in the hay
Ya never thrown it in four wheel
Climb on up in here, girl
Let me show ya how country feels


"How Country Feels" Randy Houser


Reply }}
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump: